Learn the secret of Golf...

Clubhead Lag -- the clubhead lagging behind the hands through impact -- is the most important fundamental in the golf swing.

All PGA Tour players use Lag to compress the ball while poor players don't.

 

Learn how to FEEL, CREATE and SUSTAIN the lag. Discover the benefits of the Flat Left Wrist, shaft loading and educated hands and cut your scores in half!

Hit OUT on the golf ball!

Hit out on the ball!In this article we’ll continue to explore the mechanics of the golf stroke: In a previous post, we understood why hitting down on the ball was mandatory for a geometrically sound stroke. Now, we’ll see that hitting out on the golf ball is also important to achieve a three dimensional impact: forward, downward and outward.

Using the same principle as the drawing on the downward impact, we can geometrically represent the golf swing from a top view (above the player’s head) like this: 

 Hitting out, top view

Although many players understand why it is geometrically correct to hit down on the ball, very few realize that the very same principle applies to the outward component of the stroke.

The outmost point of the club-head orbit is exactly in front of the leading shoulder as it is the center of the swing circle. As the ball is positioned before this point (with the exception of the driver where the ball may be positioned an inch before this point), you will strike the ball first then take a divot down but also OUT until you reach the outmost point of the radius of the swing.

This is what is called a “three dimensional impact”, forward, downward and outward, and is mandatory to strike a golf ball with maximum compression.

Of course, including Lag in your golf swing is an easy way to achieve this proper impact: To create Lag, you apply pressure on your golf shaft. But that pressure has to be directed in a very precise direction. Previously, we talked about a tip named “drag the wet mop”; this tip helps to feel Lag as a pressure against the shaft in the trigger finger of you trailing hand. But if you think about it, dragging a wet mop directs the pressure mainly forward as we can’t drive the mop under the ground.
But you know understand that you need to direct that pressure not only forward but also downward and outward.

Try it and you’ll know what compression on a golf ball means!

45 Responses to “Hit OUT on the golf ball!”

  1. MikeT MikeT says:

    This is the info I have sought for a few years. This is truly the “secret of golf” we have all heard about. Thanks!

  2. DaveL DaveL says:

    John, just an update since my last post, I am hitting so much better on the sweetspot and making divots in front of the ball.
    Shanking is gone but still get the occasional tops.
    I have been experimenting with different aiming points(something new for me)
    Usually my aiming point is the back of the ball, now i have moved my aiming point around depending on the type shot I want to hit and what club i have.
    It is more natural to aim at the ball and I do for the 3wood and 3 iron.
    With the shorter irons I move the aiming point more in front of the ball.

  3. DaveL DaveL says:

    John, after one month of the hitting method I can start feeling PP#3 without clubhead throwaway.. My natural tendency is to take shallow divots sometime BEFORE the ball! NowI can take longer deeper divots in front on the ball.
    I can can definely FEEL compression PP#3 particulary on my short iron and wedge shots. Before I tend to feel the ball compression with PP#1. I still believe these two PP are mutually exclusive.
    I am still having the occasion topping and shanks, something I have not done for 10 years before learning hitting method. I accept a bit of regression for longterm progresss for my golf game. i think I may have resolved those tendencies my aligning the target line not where the ball sits like you have it on the diagram from the eye of the hitter, but slightly inside that line parallel to it. So that the target line is the straight plane line of the clubshaft
    Sorry for the longdrawn out explanation. Wish I could just draw it out.
    Anyway, Your translation of TGM is great. Keep up the good work!

  4. Loui Loui says:

    Hello again John,
    I have been struggling a bit lately. When my swing goes off I seem to lose that feeling of the right side/arm firing while I rotate through the shot. I read your reply to Robin on the 25th June 2009 and that put me on track.
    I think I was cocking the right wrist upward during the takeaway and putting the right arm out of line with the shaft. In that post when you describe the left wrist cocking as the right did you mean just at the start of the take away. I mean the left wrist must also cock sideways (thumb towards forearm) as the backswing progresses ?
    Thanks for the great insights.
    Are you going to write a book?

  5. Charlie Y Charlie Y says:

    John, I’m re-submitting this at the bottom of this blog in hopes that it might help you find it more easily. I originally submitted it as a reply to your reply to my earlier message. I’m still trying to inprove my lag, particularly trying to get more lag. I’m currently trying to get more lag by adding two things to my swing. The first is allowing my wrists to flex at the top as the club head wants to keep going rearward as I begin the transition downward with my hands. I’m not cocking my wrists or cupping then, just letting them flex. The second thing is that I’m trying to increase the lag as I pull the club handle downward in the hitter’s swing. The problem I’m having to deal with is this–I have been using a vertical swing, but I can’t get the flex correct with this swing. As I reach the top, letting the wrists flex causes the left wrist to cup because the momentum wants to lift the club in the vertical plane. So, it seems that I have to flatten my swing just to that amount that the wrists can flex without cupping or bowing. In other words, I have to swing on a flatter plane where my left wrist can flex on the same plane that it was during the take back. I hope this is a correct way to determine a swing plane. If so, it solves my problem of just how much to flatten it–just enough to allow the wrists to flex in the proper direction. I want to stay as close to a vertical swing as I can (older guy with an arthritic back). Charlie Y

  6. Bill Bill says:

    Hi John,

    Just want to say that I use your site as my Bible to my game. Anytime I feel I am losing it in any respect, I just read your article’s again. I went from a 90′s player to a lower 80′s player, breaking 80 on several occasions. Thanks again for your generosity and knowledge…

    Bill

  7. DaveL DaveL says:

    Is hitting similiar to 2 handed backhand in tennis? The lower hand actively thrust into the ball with the feeling at PP#3. Whereas swinging is similiar to a onehanded backhand. pressure is felt at armpit muscle.

  8. Hello I have been on the lookout for these best possible golf irons with regards to my own degree of play, the particular callawayirons are really pricy for me at the present time howevere, if I could find the best used group for the right amount I’ve got to pay out that would be fantastic. Inform us that which brandnames are the most useful for a acceptable price range . many thanks

  9. DaveL DaveL says:

    John, you are right using PP3 or PP1 certainly give more precision to direction of the ball. I think pure swinging can lead to big slice or hooks.
    I tried to create the half roll and no roll feeling and what happened? The “half roll” I did was the TURN of the shoulders and torso powered primary by accumulator 4 with assist by accumulator 3 gave me “angled hinge” and GENTLE FADE. The “full roll” I did was primary rotation of the arms by accumulator 3 WITH ASSIST by acc 4. Same muscle groups different order. This produced a hinge slighty past horizontal and produce a GENTLE DRAW.
    Thanks for the advice!

  10. DaveL DaveL says:

    Day 3 I am hitting all my clubs well with the PP3 lag feeling. I am even able to see a target line and use the aiming spot concept to clubface moving forward and downward. My driver is still inconsistent though I tried the aiming point behind the ball for the 3wood and driver and this works for me.
    This doesn’t make any sense why it works sometimes I lose faith and steer the driver. I think if the aiming point is behind the ball would not I lose LAG??? This concept messes me up as for the other clubs aiming point is the ball or ahead of the ball and works well except for the woods.

  11. TimothyW TimothyW says:

    Ok, here’s an update on my progess, I went out and played another round with emphasis on pp#3 and focusing on low point; the results were amazing!!! I went to range prior to going to the tee box and lined up four balls and placed an old broken tee approximately 3 inches in front of each ball, I hit each ball with the goal of hitting the ball first and taking turf, the results were amazing. The divots were in front of the ball. I hit a 275 yard drive on a 475 yard par 5 and got there in two and made par. focusing on pp#3 has allowed me to get up and down a lot easier, I missed the green on a par 3 pitched the ball on the green while maintaining pp#3 and the ball stopped a foot away. One thing I’m going to have to do is relearn my distances for my clubs because in knowing how to maintain lag, I have gotten a lot longer. For shots that I didn’t hit so well it was because I didn’t maintain that pressure through impact. I can wait until my PBS comes in the mail. So, far I’ve been making more pars, those birdies are just around the corner. pp#3 has definitely allowed me to hit more GIR’s and I’m using my divot repair tool on the greens more. I’m going to have to really work on putting now. Will post an update after working with the PBS.

  12. DaveL DaveL says:

    With the swing experiments I have been striking the ball really well but also shaking and topping a few.
    I think I have finally FELT PROPER LAG with PP#3
    I have always been able to feel PP#1 I turned right hand more weak to feel the shaft on the base of the index finger. The metacarpal phalangeal joint.(This is PP3!) Of course I made some other adjustment. Strengthen.my left hand grip and address more impact fixed rather than midbody.
    it was incredible the difference.
    I think it is like changing the grip from western forehand to continetal and learning another set of protocol for that grip

  13. DaveL DaveL says:

    Your picture of from the eye of the hitter is just amazingly accurate. I have been experimenting with my swing since learning about TGM particularly trying to be aware of the my PP. PP#3 is one that I just can’t feel properly.

  14. DaveL DaveL says:

    I really like your site. Please kept on with new topics.

    In your posts abut hitting, you said that it would produce a fade. How do you get get that by hitting down, forward and OUT? I get a fade by swinging down forward and IN.

    • Hi Dave, welcome aboard!
      In the articles about Hitting and Swinging I explained that the mechanics involved in the Hitting stroke leads to a different behavior of the clubface:

      The Hitting stroke produces a “half roll” of the clubface around impact with a very distinctive “no-roll” feel in the hands.

      The Swinging stroke produces a “full roll” of the clubface around impact with a very distinctive “roll” feel in the hands.

      Also notice, that impact is not an instantaneous phenomenon. It is a two steps process: impact AND ball separation from the clubface. In between the ball is compressed against the clubface while the clubface is in a closing process.

      So, with the same geometry (down, out, forward) the hitter will strike the ball with a clubface that will have a “layback” tendency -> light fade while the swinger will have a closing face tendency -> light draw.

      Of course, it will deeply depend on your natural tendency: If you have a natural tendency to draw the ball, you could observe that a hitting stroke will produce less draw than usual.

  15. Charlie Y Charlie Y says:

    John, several months ago, your instructions on holding the lag as long as I can helped me tremendously. Before that, I was constantly hitting the ground about two inches behind the ball. As soon as I read about holding the lag, I realized immediately (I am an engineer) that my radius was lengthening out compared to my set up, causing the club head to reach the ground too soon. The second tip that made great sense to me was about the bottom of the swing being located in front of the front shoulder, which then causes the divots to be taken up into that area as the club bottoms. Your tip on beating the ground if you are a hitter made it ok for me to do so, contrary to what my more experienced friends tried to tell me, and it led me to a way to make good contact–I identify a single blade of grass right behind the ball, and I try to beat that blade into the ground–really works for me. I can it a 3 wood now since I no longer try to swing it but use it to beat that blade of grass. Now, this tip on swinging outwardly and letting the bend in the club direct the ball along the target line put the frosting on the cake for me. It cured my fades (somewhat but not completely) with my driver and fairway woods, and it has given me confidence that the ball won’t fade so badly. It is such a mental relief, not having to worry about fades. Thank you for your instructional tips.

    Charlie Y

    • Thanks a lot Charlie

      I’m delighted to see your improvements based on your understanding of sound geometry – keep thinking – play with ball position and face angle while keeping your geometry intact and see that ball going up or low or curve left and right at will!

      It won’t cease to amaze me that such obvious things leading to so much improvement get so little attention when you visit your local teaching pro! :-)

      (by the way, nice analysis of the “bend of the clubface”, you got it right!)

      • Charlie Y Charlie Y says:

        John, can you check out a couple new thoughts that hit me the other day about tempo? It isn’t quite related to geometry, but it does relate to being able to hold the right geometry. Recently, when I couldn’t hold the lag successfully on a particular hit, I had a feeling of swing too fast, so I slowed down my swing. Then it hit me–people talk about tempo. So, I worked on trhying to find the right tempo, and it turned out that I had to find just thr right balance of fast enough to get club head speed but slow enough to hold the lag. I came up with “swing only fast enough that I can still hold the lag” as my guide to how fast I can allow myself to swing. Is this how tempo and lag interact?

        Charlie Y

      • Yes Charlie, your analysis is perfect: “swing only fast enough that I can still hold the lag”.

        This translates to a certain amount of pressure. Easy to recognize and reproduce. It equals to your maximum swing speed WITHOUT losing control of the club.

        Therefore, you’ll know that a 80% pressure feel from this 100% pressure feel will provide a lot of comfort, control without much difference in distance.

        Want extra yards? Increase that pressure in PP#3 but be prepared to sustain it with everything you have (legs, trunk, arms…) without losing or breaking your “structure” – If you start to feel quick and jerky in your PP#3, choke down!

      • Charlie Y Charlie Y says:

        John, I’m still trying to inprove my lag, particularly trying to get more lag. I’m currently trying to get more lag by adding two things to my swing. The first is allowing my wrists to flex at the top as the club head wants to keep going rearward as I begin the transition downward with my hands. I’m not cocking my wrists or cupping then, just letting them flex. The second thing is that I’m trying to increase the lag as I pull the club handle downward in the hitter’s swing. The problem I’m having to deal with is this–I have been using a vertical swing, but I can’t get the flex correct with this swing. As I reach the top, letting the wrists flex causes the left wrist to cup because the momentum wants to lift the club in the vertical plane. So, it seems that I have to flatten my swing just to that amount that the wrists can flex without cupping or bowing. In order words, I have to swing on a flatter plane where my left wrist can flex on the same plane that it was during the take back. I hope this is a correct way to determine a swing plane. If so, it solves my problem of just how much to flatten it–just enough to allow the wrists to flex in the right direction. I want to stay as close to a vertical swing as I can (older guy with an arthritic back). Charlie Y

  16. Erock Erock says:

    This advise is spot on. I am taking golf instructions from a pro right now, and he has been trying to get that concept through to me for 2 months – well, I think it finally sunk in.
    Here is something that helps me – my preshot routine is to get in my stance and bring the club back with my left arm only, in an in-out track (repeat several times) – make sure you hear the swoosh and feel the snap around the ball impact area, when you bring the club down.
    Then I get in my address position, cock my right knee toward the target – feeling the tension that I am about to build, and just repeat what I did in my preshot routine – just add the right hand/arm. Keep the head down through impact and the ball flys off the iron like a pro -it is a beautiful thing.

  17. woody woody says:

    John, your lag tips & swing geometry explanation lit a fire in my game! I can’t begin to tell you how much it helps me to turn away from years of mechanical/position related swing advice and to tune into lag pressure as my sole swing thought. It is thrilling to free my mind and body on the course and trust in a repeatable reliable feel in my hands. I had lost all confidence in my longer irons, fairway woods and especially the driver. I’m loving them again after putting your advice into action.
    Two questions:
    1) Ironically, my short irons/wedge shots are suffering now that I am moving away from steering the club. They used to be the only reliable aspect of my game but in the last couple of rounds I am hitting them FAT. Perhaps I’m still trying to steer these shorter clubs instead of going down&out? I especially could use any tips on lag pressure as it relates to partial wedge shots.
    2) Geometry Confusion w/ the swing plane board: TGM related thoughts of hitting out towards first base are very helpful to letting the club go and stop my manipulating habits. How does the “out” portion work in the link to youtube video example of the 9-3 drill w/ a plane board (http://www.youtube.com/user/PureBallStriker#p/a/u/2/9RSkJr5MJH0)? The swing low pt. is clearly shown (along with the ball positioned aft), but the shaft of the club appears to me to ride on the plane board thru impact to the 3 o’clock position. If the plane board is parallel to target line should’nt the clubhead move out after impact, losing contact with the plane board? (I know its not your site info but the pureballstriker stuff seems to support and reinforce your good work)
    Thanks again!

  18. damian damian says:

    So do I make an “air divot” in front of the ball?

    Won’t that mean I release the pressure on my right trigger finger before the ball and throw the clubhead away?

    Or have I misunderstood?

    This is a very confusing concept but I’m determind to get it!
    I refuse to pay any more cash to teaching pros that refuse to discuss lag and how to do it.

    The amount of lessons I’ve wasted money on is frightening!

    Cheers,
    Damian.

  19. Hi Damian

    The aiming point is a point on the base of the plane line that you direct (aim) your hands at on the downstroke.

    Its location varies from the longest to the shortest clubs.
    For the same hand speed, it takes longer for the longest clubs to release (to square up).

    For that reason, with the driver you must aim your hands behind the ball to give it enough time to release – it could be as far back as in front of your right foot!

    And the reverse goes with the wedges: you aim in front of the ball – it could be as far forward as in front of your left foot!

    To find your aiming point with your driver, start with an extreme right aiming point (in front of your right foot) and experiment aiming your hands closer to the ball until you get it.

    Good golf!

  20. damian damian says:

    John,

    I’m using the swinging technique and it’s working well with the irons but I can’t find low point with the woods and driver.
    Is it the smae as the ball or BEFORE the ball?

    Cheers,
    Damian.

  21. To John

    Read here first: http://www.golflagtips.com/hit-down-on-the-golf-ball-dammit/#comment-254

    The drawing is not at scale, but despite common belief, head position has no incidence at all: For example, we’ve all see PGA tour players on TV play chip shots with the ball outside of their right foot – in such shots, the head is on the left of the ball!!!
    Now, place the ball at low point – Driver stroke for example – and the head will appear to be right of the ball…

    Nothing changes between those two shots except ball position in the circle!

    The drawing is very accurate but if that guy was to really hit a perfect golf shot, he would have to dig hard into the ground to go to low point – ouch! :-)

  22. John Koruna John Koruna says:

    I meant head behind the ball of course!

  23. John Koruna John Koruna says:

    Dear John,

    Thank you very much for putting this excellent website together. The drills are really helpful and on the range I get a lot of benefit from feeling the lag.

    I assume that in the picture above, the figure should be moved to the right in reality as his head should be in front of the ball?

    Regards,

    John K.

  24. Welcome Robin

    There is a Wristcock but it is not deliberately provoked.

    Let’s do two drills:

    First: The right arm cocks the left wrist
    Bending and straightening the right arm AUTOMATICALLY cocks the left wrist!!!!!!
    Wanna see?
    - Hold you club normally but split your grip: hold the shaft with your right hand on the metal.
    - Just bend your right arm and watch your left wrist cock automatically
    - Straighten your right arm and watch your left wrist uncock automatically

    Second: Let’s mess things up so you can differentiate the two things: Cocking the right wrist puts your right forearm off plane!
    If you deliberately overdo the cocking of your wrists, you’ll certainly cock your right wrist this way:
    - Again, hold you club normally and split your grip: hold the shaft with your right hand on the metal.
    - Instead of bending your right arm, keep it straight and cock both wrists up
    - Your left wrist is cocked all right like previously BUT your right wrist too and your right arm is now OUT OF LINE with your shaft.

    You are now in a bad condition to provide support to your clubshaft through the shot with your right arm.
    The use of the pressure in your index finger will also be more complicated.

    So, what you consider as “hardly any wristcock” in regard to your own FEEL might be in fact the correct amount of wristcock.
    This could explain your current loop/kink wristy swing.

  25. Robin Woolf Robin Woolf says:

    Dear John,

    Absolutely fascinated by your golflag website. I have definitely been a swinger of the ball and as such have developed a long,wristy swing with a kind of loop or kink at the top. I am really looking forward to putting your teachings into practice tomorrow. From the several practice swings I have so far been attempting indoors it feels to me that there is hardly any wristcock in this method.Am I right?

    Regards

    Robin Woolf

  26. pete pete says:

    Hi John,

    Thanks for the excellent reply. Makes sense to me.

    great website keep up the great work making the TGM easy for us all…

  27. Hi Pete, this one is very interesting!
    Get ready for an unexepected explanation! :-)

    Attacking the inside aft quadrant of the ball is not a bad thing but it is not exactly right.
    Knowing what REALLY happens is important because with swing according to our concepts!

    Imagine replace your Golf club with a tennis racket.
    Have a look again at the drawing above:
    - every ball placed prior to the Outmost Point/Low Point will be contacted by the racket in its inside aft quadrant.
    - a ball placed AT the Outmost Point/Low Point will be contacted exactly at the aft.

    But this is most interesting:
    - every ball placed prior to the Outmost Point/Low Point and hit by the racket will go to right field – tangentially to the arc.
    - only a ball placed at the Outmost Point/Low Point will go straight to the target!!!

    Under those conditions, how can we possibly hit it straight to the target and not straight right with a wedge???

    This is because the club manufacturers have hooked the clubface to make it look square to the target!!!
    Imagine a weird tennis racket with a hooked face: instead of going right, the hooked face allows for a straight shot!!!

    This tells you another important thing: Thanks to the manufacturers ALL your clubs are more or less hooked (Driver = no hooked face!) – this means that you will contact the ball ALWAYS AFT with the CLUBFACE (and not inside AFT) even if your CLUBHEAD is travelling out!!!

    Thus, the purpose of the recommendation of hitting the inside aft quadrant is more to make you go to the Outmost Point/Low Point for every shot than to really touch the ball in the inside/aft quadrant.

  28. Pete Pete says:

    So does that mean that we should be ALWAYS attacking the inside back quandrant of the ball. i.e if the below cross represents the ball we should hit down at bottom right ??

    ¦
    ¦
    ——
    ¦ x
    ¦

  29. [...] regardless of what direction the swing is relative to the target. Here’s a pic that should help: Golf Lag Tips*

  30. It seems that while searching for the OUT you forfait the DOWN…!

    Try this hammer drill: hold your club in your left hand only and to your left side.
    From then, raise it up in front of you and hammer the ground.
    Repeat a few times to get a feel for hit – you can hammer it pretty hard isn’t it?
    Have you noticed that while doing that you fell pressure in you last 3 fingers of your left hand?

    This is pressure point #2. It’s related to the uncoking of your left wrist.

    Now, do the exact same move but hammer SIDEWAYS on the plane of the swing… this will help you feel the Throw out action is refer to in the Swinging article: http://www.golflagtips.com/hitting-vs-swinging-part-2-the-swing/

    Hammer it strongly DOWN and OUT, sideways and you should have a great amount of compression and power.

  31. Steve Steve says:

    I’ve read your various articles and I understand the concepts, but I’m having difficulty putting it into practice. From your pressure point article, I got the index finger feeling the pressure and I feel my left arm pressed against my chest (I’m a righty). My ball is going straight (I found I was hitting draws/hooks and realized I was closing the head at address – probably to compensate to my prior swing’s slicing).

    I am trying this out with using just my 6 iron on the range.

    It does not feel like I am hitting the ball solid (it feels to me like I am getting the bottom half of the club or something similar). My ball is flying about 140 and rolling to 150 (tough to fully tell on range) which I think is too short for the 6 iron. Once I cleared the 150 in the air (possibly 160) and the hit felt different, but I have no idea what I did differently.

    I also do not see much of a divot. If I do get one, it is right at the ball or just an inch beyond and it is not deep at all (just scraping the grass).

    Any thoughts on drills that would allow me to get the “feel” correct? Possibly a pressure point I’m missing?

  32. Absolutely right Mike.

    It’s a huge difference isn’t it?

    A lot of Golfers have never paid attention to the geometry of the stroke and intuitively think that the ball is low point.

    This could be true with the driver as low point and ball position coincide but this is no longer the case with the other sticks in the bag!

    As a consequence, if you think of going IN after impact on a 7 iron, you will probably cast the club, not use the full leverage of the left arm + shaft and instead use a shaft only lever with a center of the circle located at the wrists!

    Shorter radius = Shorter leverage = huge loss of mass = loss of distance (without speaking of consistency)!

    Keep going, you’re on the right track!

  33. Mike Mike says:

    I feel bad John! I’m keeping you busy on a Sunday morning LOL. Totally makes sense. Now getting the ball position right is key :)

    You know it’s kind of strange. I always thought swing path was in to in, where you come into the ball, then immediately the club goes back in on the circle.

    No wonder I can’t hit a draw to save my life. If I’m correct, you are saying the clubface hits the ball, the low point is what I would say farther out to the right on the circle, then after low point, the club comes back in.

    So in a sense, my feeling of circle was either too confined or tight, meaning, I kept thinking the club hit the ball, then immediately should be back inside.

    I’m going to try to think about the whole circle being shifted to my left at address. Does that make sense?

    Thanks as always,
    Mike

  34. To Mike:

    Snipped from above:
    “The outmost point of the club-head orbit is exactly in front of the leading shoulder as it is the center of the swing circle. As the ball is positioned before this point (with the exception of the driver where the ball may be positioned an inch before this point), you will strike the ball first then take a divot down but also OUT until you reach the outmost point of the radius of the swing.”

    Impact point is where you place the ball on the circle. If you place the ball in the middle of your stance you’ll srike the ball first but then your clubhead will continue to go down and out until it arrives in front of your left shoulder. The impact point is only on the clubheads way. This is not the final target.

    Low point is the target.

  35. Thanks Wojo, this is exactly my intent: to respect the TGM spririt while keeping things practical and accessible!

  36. Mike Mike says:

    Can you explain the “impact point” in the image above? I’m a bit confused at it.

    Thanks,
    Mike

  37. Wojo Wojo says:

    Great site, your explaining the TGM in layman terms and great visuals.

  38. Clive Clive says:

    JOhn you are right on when you talk about the need to hit “out”. All too many players steer to the left, for fear of going right, and this means they don’t properly swing from inside to out. Good work.

    Clive.

  39. Thanks, we’re passionate about the game of golf and happy to share tips that are rarely covered in today’s instruction!

  40. Was looking for some tips to improve my stroke and just happened to find your site in Google. Thanks for sharing these tips.

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Aiming-Point Location Driver to Wedges

Aiming-Point: Too far forward

Aiming-Point: Bad location with the Driver

Aiming-Point: Good location with the Driver

Divot Location demonstrated with a Hitting stroke - Swing Sequence

The eye of the Hitter - 3 - Follow Through

The eye of the Hitter - 1 - Address

The eye of the Hitter - 2 - Startdown